Make Charitable Gifts by Year End to Save Deductions from the New Tax Law

By Jim Glass, J.D.
IRA Analyst

Charitable GivingThis is the season for charitable giving. And this year it is especially so for those who want to get the most tax benefit from charity deductions before new Tax Cuts and Jobs Act becomes law. The Act effectively reduces the tax-saving value of the charitable contribution deduction for many.

While details may change, at this writing the Act increases the standard deduction on joint returns to $24,000 from $12,700, on single returns to $12,000 from $6,350, and eliminates many popular itemized deductions. Because taxpayers claim itemized deductions only when their total exceeds the standard deduction, lawmakers project that under the Act the number of taxpayers who itemize deductions may be reduced by half or more.

Continue Reading …

Planning for a Disclaimer in 5 Easy Steps

What is a disclaimer?

beneficiary disclaimerA disclaimer is a formal refusal of an inheritance (or part of an inheritance) by a beneficiary.  By creating a “path” for disclaimed assets to follow, a skilled planner can provide a beneficiary with the option to pass assets to alternate beneficiaries.

1. Make sure the IRA owner names contingent beneficiaries.  Naming a contingent beneficiary directly on the beneficiary form is good practice and a pivotal part of most disclaimer planning.  When a disclaimer is executed, the person making the disclaimer is treated as if he or she had predeceased the IRA owner.  The contingent beneficiary would then inherit the property.  If there is no contingent beneficiary listed, often the funds will default to the estate of the deceased IRA owner.

Continue reading