6 Options for Rolling Over Your Employer 401(k) Plan

401(k) rolloverWhen it comes time to rollover your employer 401(k), what are your best options? Most think the best solution is to rollover your plan to an IRA. Here are six options to evaluate before making a decision.  These are available to plans with employees – not all options will apply to sole proprietor plans. Most options will not apply to SEP and SIMPLE plan participants.

1. Rollover to an IRA. There are a lot of benefits to this option. Rolling over to an IRA is a tax-free transaction when a direct rollover is used to move the funds. IRAs have more investment choices and are more flexible when it comes to distributions and financial planning. You generally get better service from your advisors than you will get from the 800 number for the plan.

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A Not So Simple Discussion on SIMPLE IRAs

Small Business IRAs

SIMPLE IRAs are popular retirement vehicles for small businesses. They are relatively cheap to adopt and are easy to understand and administer. However, that doesn’t mean problems do not arise. Routinely, we see issues involving ineligible plan sponsors, missed contributions, and late deposits. If you are thinking about adopting a SIMPLE IRA for your small business, it is essential that you understand the rules.

Establishing a SIMPLE IRA is simple enough. You execute a written agreement with a custodian that can either be a prototype plan, a Form 5304-SIMPLE, or a Form 5305-SIMPLE. You could also use an individually designed plan that meets the tax code requirements, but that is rare. Each eligible employee should receive a Summary Plan Description that not only complies with the IRS rules, but meets the Department of Labor standards under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act.

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Combining Inherited IRAs and their RMDs

combine IRAsIRA owners can clearly combine the accounts they own and they can combine the required minimum distributions (RMDs) from multiple IRAs and take them from any one or combination of their IRAs. The rules for combining Inherited IRAs and RMDs are more complex.

An IRA owner cannot combine IRAs they own with IRAs that they have inherited, unless the inherited IRA came from their current spouse. IRAs that are inherited from the same person can be combined, as long as the RMD calculation is done in the manner for all of the inherited IRA accounts. Generally, this is easy. If Dad had two IRA accounts and you inherit half of each of those accounts because you are named on the beneficiary forms for those accounts, then you can combine them. If you keep the accounts separate, you can calculate the RMD on each account and then combine it and take all or any part of the RMD from either account as long as you take the full RMD.

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Tips on Claiming Social Security

Claiming Social SecurityWhen it’s time to consider signing up for Social Security, turn to your financial advisor for advice and recommendations. Social Security is challenging with numerous complex rules that are confusing. Recent changes have added to the difficulty in how to correctly interpret the law’s meanings and how choices can impact you long-term. Often, those who are relying on Social Security Administration (SSA) assistance, find their recommendations are not the best choices for their unique situation. Read on for  tips on claiming Social Security.

The Social Security Administration has received criticism. The U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging urged the SSA to improve the recommendations it provides to individuals. Their concern was based on a U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) report that emphasized inconsistencies in the recommendations that the SSA and its claims personnel were giving to people applying for benefits.

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